In the Bins

This topic contains 1 reply, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  WillieeArmellini 2 years, 8 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 16 total)
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  • #7050

    rc
    Participant

    bins
    Is anyone having their flowers shipped in bins?
    We received our first shipment of flowers from California shipped in bins. These cardboard boxes measure approx. 40″x48″x (42″tall). The flowers and greens aren’t pinned down in any way. Instead they are simply layered in the bin and piled up.

    I was slightly skeptical but delighted with the results. From this particular grower I ordered 1,300 bunches of flowers/greens that fit nicely in three bins. The greens were packed on the bottom with the flowers on top. I estimate if these were packed in standard California half boxes it would require 50-60 boxes.

    This way of packing is extremely efficient. We were able to get better pricing, save money on freight, and we don’t have soooo much cardboard to deal with.

    Anyone else shipping this way?

    • This topic was modified 2 years, 9 months ago by  rc.
    #7053

    WillieeArmellini
    Keymaster

    My Father would be jumping for joy if he had ever seen these. I had not even heard about them. Imagine a single box that is designed to really fit on a pallet. I can’t think of any better way to maximize the shipping of bulk products. They might have gotten the idea from those watermellon crates that accomplish the same.

    Pleased to hear that your experience was a good one and thanks for sharing that. I would be happy to find out more and post if you are able to identify the grower.

    #7055

    rc
    Participant

    Evergreen Floral Farms is the grower.

    The boxes are designed for the produce industry as they were marked celery – carrots – broccoli – green cabbage – red cabbage – lettuce.

    I was most concerned about the African Marigolds as the large flower easily breaks off. They actually arrived much better than if they were packed in standard boxes. The 200 bunches were packed on top of 200 bunches of melaleuca snake vine that filled the bin. Other bins had celosia, safari sunset, naked seeded eucalyptus, millet, cattails and ligustrum, all riding better than if they were packed in the traditional way.

    #7056

    WillieeArmellini
    Keymaster

    Great I will try to find out more.

    #7057

    thinkflowers
    Participant

    Several growers in California have been shipping this way for several years.

    #7063

    CBI
    Participant

    Do they generate any heat in the middle during transit? They appear to be very efficient.

    #7066

    WillieeArmellini
    Keymaster

    I had to post this for how not to do it.

    #7076

    gchoice
    Moderator

    RC….seems like a good idea when shipping from California by truck. The only problem that could happen is field heat that is not removed by pre-cooling. Then there is a chance the contents become like heated silage.

    #7077

    bear
    Participant

    We’ve been receiving various types of greens in these bins for a long time now – quality has not suffered at all, and the savings on product and freight is significant.
    Bear

    #7078

    WillieeArmellini
    Keymaster

    But have you ever received flowers this way. RC did this system work well because you had a mix of greens and flowers?

    #7079

    rc
    Participant

    Williee,

    I placed my order and Evergreen packed it. It only makes sense to put the greens on the bottom.
    I do believe, however, if I had ordered 380 bu of marigolds for example they could fill them up in one bin without a problem. The picture they sent me as an example had sunflowers being loaded on the bottom of the bin. I suppose it was going to be a full bin of 380 bunches. They offer a smaller bin too at 26.7cf (the larger bin is 45.6cf.)

    I think this is a fabulous idea. It has always been my opinion California shippers packed flower inefficiently. It makes them expensive. Even inexpensive flowers become expensive when only 15 bu are packed in a large California half box.

    I see this as a possible game changer. I remember Kitayamas toying with the idea of growing carnations again. Just think of the savings if they could pack 380 bunches in one bin instead of having to strap them down in 20 boxes!

    #7080

    bear
    Participant

    We’ve done sunflowers by the bin and they were fine – not sure how more fragile flowers would hold up at the bottom of a bin full, but also have not tried any. It always sticks in my craw when the CA freight bill is as much as the CA flower bill – those CA boxes seem to always hold a lot of empty cube space.
    Bear

    #7081

    WillieeArmellini
    Keymaster

    Reached out to the CCFC to see if they could point me to companies that might be using these. They said:

    “Unfortunately, I am not able to help you here. I’m not aware of any CA farms using that method of shipment for flowers.”

    So that leaves me fishing for more contacts. RC if you could PM the contact info for Evergreen I will start with them.

    The obvious draw back is that these “boxes” need to be handled with a pallet jack or forklift and are not practical for air shipments. But other than that they make sense to me.

    #7101

    jzzbassman
    Participant

    I know Kendall does Bins on safari, wax, suns, euc, proteas.

    #7142

    rc
    Participant

    We received more flowers in bins with good results.
    I figured we saved roughly 13% on FOB product cost and roughly 20% on freight. This equates to a savings of $220 per bin of flowers. For my flower shop if I receive 4 or 5 bins a week the savings will be in excess of $50,000 a year.

    I wonder if this could be implemented in South America. It seems there the opposite is happening, smaller and smaller boxes. Bulk packing should be way more economical for those willing to purchase that way.

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